[Re]Verse Pitch Competition

An Event Series in Austin, Texas for Social Entrepreneurs Where We Pitch To You

2018 INNOVATION PRIZE POOL: $20,000

Two  Award Categories: Seed Stage & Growth Stage

January 17- March 7, 2018

Entrepreneurs are used to pitching their business idea to investors, partners, and anyone they might share an elevator ride with. In this competition, the tables will turn. The [Re]Verse Pitch Competition is a social innovation program to help turn valuable raw materials that are currently leaving local businesses, non-profits, and institutions as waste into the raw materials for new or expanding social enterprises.

Competitors work with mentors & advisors to develop repurposing business ideas and compete for Innovation Prizes to help start this new venture.

 

 

Thank you to our 2018 Innovation Prize Sponsors!

2018 Material Suppliers

Balfour Beatty US

A construction company has about 24 used concrete anchor straps every month. These industry standard fall protection straps with varying colors & lengths are embedded into concrete floors or columns and cut flush when no longer needed.  See the product spec sheet here.

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Gold Rush Vinyl

A new record manufacturing plant has finished PVC records that do not meet their quality standard, as well as excess PVC material from the trimming of their 7", 10" and 12" records. Over 6,000 lbs per month are available. 

 

 

 

 

JOSCO Products

A local textile recycler is unable to use the top part of denim jeans and cotton pants with metal buttons, zippers, and pockets. Approximately 500-1,000 lbs/month are currently going to the landfill.

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Quality Seafood Market

A local seafood market has 4,500-5,000 pounds of oyster shells per month available!

 

 

Still Austin Whiskey Co.

An Austin whiskey distillery produces 30,000 gallons a month of distiller's spent grain. A standard batch includes 1800 gals of water mixed with 2500 pounds of non-GMO food grade white corn, 700 pounds of food-grade red winter wheat, and 350 pounds of malted barley. Starch has been extracted from these grains but they retain protein & fat. Still Austin is able to divert some material to local farms (as seen in this Instagram video!) but they have more than these farmers need.

Stitch Texas

This garment factory has 2 - 6 garbage bags full of textile scraps each month, ranging from cottons to linens to bamboo to sweatshirt material.

Texas Reds and Whites

This downtown tasting room has approximately 60 wine bottles per month that they would like to see creatively repurposed. 

 

 

University of Texas Resource Recovery

The University of Texas at Austin has up to 40 tons a month of usable and damaged pressboard furniture, mostly desks, bookcases, and tables, that it is unable to divert through donation or auction.

GET INVOLVED

An entrepreneur interested in starting a business that has a positive social impact? A non-profit professional intrapraneur interested in a creative way to diversify your revenue and/or offering direct job training to their clients?

An experienced creative, technical or business professional interested in mentoring others?

A service provider that works with start-ups or small businesses?

Get in touch!

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INSPIRATION

For-profit and non-profit enterprises across the country are demonstrating the value can be created from waste. Get inspired by these local, national, and global reuse and remanufacturing enterprises:

Pentatonic: Smartphone glass, plastic bottles, and more into furniture

Logro Farms: Brewery spent grain used to grow oyster mushrooms

Looptworks: Post-Consumer Textiles into New Clothing and Accessories

The Austin Rubber Company: Tires into shoes

Bureo Skateboards: Fishing Nets Into Skateboards

Granite Recyclers Austin: Granite scrap into tiles, pavers, and gifts

Open Arms is a USA-Made sustainable apparel and sewn goods manufacturer empowering refugee women through living wage employment. This social enterprise is affiliated with the Multicultural Refugee Coalition and has used reclaimed fabric and other textiles from large companies, including IKEA and Build-A-Sign, to create accessories and clothing.

The Empowerment Plan: Automotive insulation into coats that transform into sleeping bags at night.

St. Vincent de Paul Society of Lane County, Oregon: Candles into skateboard wax, window glass into gifts, dog beds from industrial scrap, and more.